“Ham radio is dead”

This is in response to a Facebook post I saw. I responded there, but I’m going to break it out a bit deeper here. Sorry to those experiencing deja vu.

I was first licensed at 11 years old. I liked contesting, DX’ing, being on HF, operating CW/SSB, etc.. I did not like VHF. I did not like the tech stuff. I had very little technical interest, but I sure did like working multipliers. Being young made me the minority. Being of any age but interested in old-fashioned operating made me part of an even slimmer minority.

There was no BitX or Arduino or $50 QRP kits then. Had there been, I would have migrated into those. I didn’t have much money in middle school, so I was interested in doing whatever I could afford. Luckily, my parents bought me a TS-440 and a G5RV one Christmas and I was off to the races.

Then came high school, college, a career, etc. (in this case “etc.” means “girls”). I took down a lot of gear and was dormant for a while. I didn’t seriously return to the hobby until I was hired to work at ARRL HQ. Then I put up a tower, beams, bought an FT-1000, amps, and started chasing DX again. If I hadn’t been hired there, it would have taken me longer to return. This is because…

Ham radio is for middle-aged individuals with disposable income, a home, and an understanding spouse.

We spend so much energy trying to recruit young people, but that clearly isn’t a great return-on-investment when it comes to our numbers. Sure, kids are the future — but they have about two decades before they can carve out a realistic place for ham radio in their lives. There are certainly exceptions in our ranks, but we’re talking marketing “dollar per gallon” here.

If we did a survey, I suspect most of here have taken a hiatus from the hobby. I further suspect that hiatus came while we were getting jobs, starting families, and buying homes. So where would you sink the advertising money: on your 10 year-old self or on your 40 year-old self? My money is on the latter.

I’m thankful to have been in this hobby from a young age. At 28, I’ve been licensed the majority of my life. Heck, I can join QCWA before I’m even 40. So don’t read this as “ham radio is not for kids.” I’m just suggesting we avoid exclusively marketing to that crowd, and focus our efforts where the mileage is better.

73
Mike

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